Clionadh Cosmetics: Overview and Comparisons of the Stained Glass Collection

But wait! There’s more!

I know I said the Stained Glass segment was over in the last post, but I wanted to show y’all some quick comparisons of similar shades. This post will not show every possible group of close colors, but hopefully these will give you an understanding of some of the similarities in the Stained Glass collection. 

I also wanted to show y’all some photos of the whole collection, including photos of my haul of the most recently launched shadows.  

But after that, the party is really over. Get ready to say your goodbyes. 

About the Stained Glass Collection

Unless this is the first post of this swatch party that you’re reading, you already know what’s up. The Clionadh Cosmetics Stained Glass collection has over 90 different multichrome shadows — and counting! 

The Stained Glass shadows are packaged in a beautiful sleeve that matches the Stained Glass empty magnetic palette (available for purchase separately from the shadows). 

There are currently nine different formulas of multichromes in the collection. The swatches below will show you some comparisons of Stained Glass shadows across the different formulas.

Ambient vs Cathedral vs Weld

These three shadows are not dupes. although they all appeared to be shades of pink in the pan from an aerial view. 

Color Descriptions (swatched below from top to bottom/right to left)
  • Ambient (Series 1 Iridescent): Translucent silver base with with pink-peach-lime reflects
  • Cathedral (Pastel): Grungy olive-grey base that shifts pink-peach-gold
  • Weld (Jewelled): Metallic with grungy rose pink-antique gold-lime-teal-navy shifts
Ochre vs Weathered vs Chalice vs Majesty

These golds are not perfect dupes. Weathered and Majesty are quite similar. Ochre is a touch more orange than the other shadows. Chalice is the most unique of this bunch, as it has burnt orange base and a glitter-like texture.

Color Descriptions (swatched below from top to bottom/right to left)
  • Ochre (Deep Iridescent): Light, warm tan base that shifts gold-lime-turquoise
  • Weathered (Jewelled): Metallic with antique gold-moss green-mint-silver shifts
  • Chalice (Hybrid): Burnt orange base with medium glitter particles that shift yellow-lime-silver-red
  • Majesty (Vibrant): Orange base that shifts gold-green-turquoise
Reflectance vs Fluoresce vs Cathedral vs Ripple vs Keystone vs Lineage

These multichromes are quite similar. They are not perfect dupes but all have a beautiful turquoise or aqua color. 

Note: Ripple is also close to a few other Glitter Multichromes, but you can see those compared in the Glitter Multichrome post.

Color Descriptions (swatched below from top to bottom/right to left)
  • Reflectance (Series 1 Iridescent): Translucent base with turquoise-blue-violet pink reflects
  • Fluoresce (Series 2 Iridescent): Translucent base with turquoise-blue-purple reflects
  • Cathedral (Pastel): Grungy olive-grey base that shifts pink-peach-gold
  • Ripple (Glitter): Sheer aqua-green base with large glitter particles that shift turquoise-indigo-violet
  • Keystone (Pastel): Cool grey base that shifts green-blue-indigo
  • Lineage (Vibrant): Mint base that reflects pearly pink-gold-lime

Azure vs Shard vs Tower

These blue multichromes are not perfect dupes, but they are similar in that they are some of the deeper turquoise or blue multichromes in the Stained Glass collection. Tower appears the most turquoise, while Azure is the brightest.

Color Descriptions (swatched below from top to bottom/right to left)
  • Azure (Deep Iridescent): Light, warm tan base that shifts gold-lime-turquoise
  • Shard (Hybrid): Brown base with small/medium glitter particles that shift turquoise-indigo-violet red
  • Tower (Pastel): Cool grey base that shifts blue-purple-pink
Glisten vs Tracery

These purple multichromes are quite similar, especially in their non-shifty states. Glisten may be a touch more blue-leaning than Tracery. Glisten also has a white base, unlike Tracery.

Color Descriptions (swatched below from top to bottom/right to left)
  • Glisten (Glitter-Type Iridescent): Translucent base with violet-pink-orange-gold reflects
  • Tracery (Glitter): Semi-pigmented purple base with large glitter particles that shift indigo-pink-orange
Thoughts

There are lots of similar shades in the Stained Glass collection. If you don’t want to end up with too many shades of the same tone, choose wisely. Read the color descriptions if you want to compare some shadows that are not pictured together.

When I have more time, I want to compare more of these shades. I especially want to focus on the similarities in the Hybrid and Jewelled lines. If you want to see a particular combination of shadows, please let me know in the comments.

My final thought for this massive Clionadh Cosmetics swatch party: WHEW! I hate to see y’all go, but I love to watch these photos leave my archives. Until the next swatch party!

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3 thoughts on “Clionadh Cosmetics: Overview and Comparisons of the Stained Glass Collection”

  1. Hi Day,

    This was super helpful and your swatches are amazing! Reflectance has me weak in the knees; I wish I picked that one up! Below are some of the shadows I would love to see a comparison of:

    Blaze-Burnt Sienna-Heiress
    Forge-Gothic-Smolder
    Oculus-Anneal-Verte-Trefoil
    Vermillion-Mosaic-Engrave-Forge

    I could go on, but I will stop for now. I was wondering would you be open to comparing shadows from different brands. I think some of Devinah’s shadows resemble some of the Clionadh ones. I tried the Terra Moon’s Iridescent Chameleons this year and I am sure there are comparable shades from the brand as well. Lastly, if you did do a comparison would also be open to comparing the formulas and stating which one is your fave?

    Reply
  2. This is an ideal post for me. I am currently limiting my eyeshadow purchases for 2021. This post just single handedly stopped me from just blind buying an entire collection and instead tailoring it to what’s “necessary”.

    Reply

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